Built Environment
The building and construction sector is of key importance to the sustainable development. Because this sector is one of the three consumption clusters – housing, transportation and food – that have been identified by life-cycle studies as the most important in terms of their environmental burden. Buildings can have extensive direct and indirect impacts on the environment throughout their life cycle. Buildings use resources such as raw materials, water and energy; generate waste due to construction, operation and demolition; and emit potentially harmful atmospheric emissions. It is essential to create buildings that are efficient with resources, affordable to build and operate, good to inhabit and appropriate to the context based on different areas of the planet. Built environment has narrow relation with many other disciplinary. That’s why this group is organized with other groups, ‘Appropriate Technologies for Inclusive Development’ and ‘Energy and the environment’. Session 1 : Rethinking Built Environment To Move Beyond Sustainability (Jointly hosted with the Energy and Environment Group) Session 2 : Earth Architecture Design Workshop (Jointly hosted with the Appropriate Technologies for Inclusive Development Group)
Date / Time 2017-07-28 13:30   --   16:30
Room M3
Conveners / Chairs
Synopsis
KICT DAY in EUROPE, Closed Meeting
Speakers
Date / Time 2017-07-28 13:30   --   15:10
Room E8
Conveners / Session Chairs
  • MR. LEE, Seung-ho (General Director at Groupe ZI:UM, Paris France) CONVENER
  • MISS. HYUN, So Young (Senior Consultant at Mitie Energy) CHAIR
Synopsis The building and construction sector is of key importance to the development of Africa and the wellbeing of its population. Africa can fulfil the demand for a built environment that meets the needs of Africa people through the application of sustainable building and construction concepts. Sustainable building and construction is important for the region and can offer potential to improve the health of people and the environment in surrounding areas as well as reduce the effect of poverty by upgrading unplanned settlements. The building sector is one of the three consumption clusters – housing, transportation and food – that have been identified by life-cycle studies as the most important in terms of their environmental burden. Activities falling within the ‘shelter’ category, specifically the building sector, account for some 40% of overall energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions, and a majority of material resource use. Accordingly, the sector offers a substantial emissions reduction potential at low or no cost. On the basis sustainable construction should become the rule and not the exception. It is essential to create buildings that are efficient with resources, affordable to build and operate, good to inhabit and appropriate to the context based on different areas of Africa. It would contribute to employment generation and community participation when one considers that physical structures are created by people and communities. To make it happen, knowledge and skills development are fundamental requirements for enabling sustainable construction and building practices. To undertake construction in a more sustainable way raw materials used in the process should harmonize with the physical and functional characteristics of local ecosystems. Finally, sustainable building and construction will require a life-cycle thinking approach that considers all aspects of the construction and building life cycle, beginning from the supply of the raw materials and passing through construction, use – including refurbishment – and demolition of physical structures. This session will introduce background and process of Earth Architecture Design Workshop organized by I-Dream plus a number of sustainable design and construction activities conducted in Chad and will also analyses lesson-learned and potential application of those lessons from those projects.
Speakers
  • MR. PARK, Geunsun (I-DREAM) [ 13:30 - 13:50 ]
    Title: Background and basic direction of soil construction in Chad
  • MISS. SONG, Hakyoung (Arts et Metiers ParisTech) [ 13:50 - 14:10 ]
    Title: A user-centered design approach for earth architecture project in Chad, Africa
  • MR. JEONG, Hyunseung (Leonard Design Architects) [ 14:10 - 14:30 ]
    Title: Affordable rammed earth housing prototype in Chad
  • MISS. JUNG, Misoo (Ecole de Paris-Malaquais) [ 14:30 - 14:50 ]
    Title: Modular Architecture for self-help housing with sustainable material earth in Chad
  • MR. ESHTIAGHI, Amir (ASCE) [ 14:50 - 15:10 ]
    Title: Structure Analysis of Compressed Soil Bricks Masonry Structure
Date / Time 2017-07-28 10:50   --   12:30
Room E5
Conveners / Session Chairs
  • MISS. HYUN, So Young (Senior Consultant at Mitie Energy) CONVENER
Synopsis Buildings can have extensive direct and indirect impacts on the environment throughout their life cycle. Buildings use resources such as raw materials, water and energy; generate waste due to construction, operation and demolition; and emit potentially harmful atmospheric emissions. On the other hand, buildings also face multiple climate change impacts. Many buildings are vulnerable to progressive changes in climate and to extreme events and have already experienced big increases in damage over recent decades. Recent attempts to address this challenge call for an integrated, synergistic approach that considers all phases of the building life. This approach, called "sustainable design", supports an increased commitment to “environmental stewardship and conservation, and results in an optimal balance of cost, environmental, societal, and human benefits while meeting the mission and function of the intended facility”. The main objectives of sustainable design are to avoid resource depletion of raw materials, water and energy; prevent environmental degradation caused by buildings throughout their life cycle; and create better built environments that are liveable, healthy, comfortable, safe, and productive. The philosophy of sustainability is the framework from which all technical and many functional decisions are derived. Sustainability is rapidly becoming part of mainstream debates but there are doubts about its efficacy to tackle some of the most acute global problems. One reason is that the sustainability discourse often seems doomed to only scratch the surface. Sustainability community needs to take a more radical position in rethinking its position from a goal oriented perspective. This session will discuss how sustainability could go beyond shared value and incorporate additional approaches that can foster transformative change with highly desirable outcomes. Topics include, but are not limited to: - Resilient design and regenerative development - Sustainable development processes, governance and community engagement - Innovative systems, technologies and products responding to emerging challenges - Smart and sustainable design, construction, and operation of new and existing built facilities - Management of information and knowledge on innovation and sustainability - Sustainability through Data-Driven Design (DDD) - Bridging the buidling energy performance gap - Health and wellbeing in the built environment
Speakers
  • DR. PELSMAKERS, Sofie (University of Sheffield & ECD Architects) [ 10:50 - 11:30 ]
    Title: A new paradigm for sustainable construction: the power of evidence-based design
  • MISS. LEE, Hyojung (Sweco Rakennetekniikka Oy) [ 11:30 - 11:50 ]
    Title: MODER: Mobilization of innovative design tools for refurbishing of buildings at district level
  • MISS. KWON, Minyoung (TU Delft) [ 11:50 - 12:10 ]
    Title: Impact of façade renovation strategies on energy savings in offices
  • MISS. HYUN, So Young (Mitie Energy / UCL) [ 12:10 - 12:30 ]
    Title: Wearable Technology for Health and Wellbeing in the Workplace